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It was yesterday morning when I noticed that Dumbork developed some small, white lumps on the pads of her feet. Upon seeing the lumps, I immediately scooped Dumbork out of the tank to closely examine her feet. It was circular, raised, and appeared to be full of water, or maybe even pus. I searched “blisters” on the net but came up empty-handed. I decided to take Dumbork to the vet; she was due for a check-up anyway, and let her swim around the rest of the day.

right foot

right foot

left foot

left foot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Later that day I noticed that Dumbork didn’t want to bask, and didn’t want to touch her feet on any surface. When she’s on the resting pad, she keeps her feet tucked inside the body. I felt her feet again, the lumps were still there, but there’s no change in size or color. I turned off her basking light (she wasn’t using them) and let her sleep early.

This morning, my first concern was the said lumps. I noticed that they became thinner, more flat, but still noticeable. I have half a heart to proceed with the vet visit. I thought that maybe, if I wait for a few days, it would disappear (remember the red spot on her neck a year ago that disappeared suddenly?) But my sister (Dumbork’s original owner) convinced me. What if that problem arose again? So I packed up Dumbork’s travel box, her water container and we set off.

 

It seemed that today was Vaccination day for the dogs at the Veterinary Hospital. We were sixth in line, and the area was filled with the occasional bark, scuffles, and meows. I was the only one there who had a reptile (amphibian?) as a pet.

Dumbork was called, and we proceeded to an examination room. Her vet commented that her shell looks good (if you remember, the last vet visit was about a slight case of pyramiding). I immediately told the vet about the blisters. He went outside, grabbed a weighing scale, weighed Dumbork (100 grams), then proceeded to open a syringe and told me to help flip her, tummy-up!

 

I was surprised, but I followed his directions hastily. At first Dumbork was calm, but when the needle was inserted in the lump, she went berserk – arms and feet kicking and stretching, head trying to turn around, suddenly peeing on my hand! She kept her feet tucked in, but the vet was a skilled one, he managed to get a sample. I cleaned her mess and we were told to wait outside for the lab results.

I texted everyone about her condition. I was becoming paranoid, what if these were cancer sores (is there such thing?) Dumbork seemed mad at me; she kept staring as if it’s my fault, and when the dogs were barking, she seemed to listen to them, straining her head upwards and looking for the source of the sound.

We were called again for the second time. It was Bacterial Pododermatitis. The vet said that it was good that we caught it early, because it might lead to a dangerous lesion. He didn’t say the cause, and I didn’t press him for it, it seemed one of those infections that come and go. I will search more about this when I have the time, and I will share what I have learned with you.

He prescribed an ointment for us, Fusidic Acid, to be applied on the affected area every day for 14 days and to let it dry for 15 minutes before putting her back in the water. I thanked the vet, paid the bills, and we went home.

Meh

Meh

Ouchie in my butt!

Ouchie in my butt!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I rinsed Dumbork immediately (there were some cotton fibers in her butt) and put her back in the tank. She’s swimming now, though she is still not allowing her feet to touch any surface. I will buy the ointment later and then I will add some pictures.

To have this ordeal 6 days before her second birthday was kind of stressful. Hopefully Dumbork will respond well to the medication and she will be fine and dandy after two weeks. Wish us luck!

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